White Like Them

Years ago I had this debate with a group here in the South…..it all began when I heard someone bitching about Black music and how irritating it was…..

But it began when a couple of men were talking about mixed race marriages and their offspring…….their big question was which culture is the best to bring up their children?

My first question was what did they mean by culture.

After a few minutes of bumbling and stumbling they moved their conversation to the music.  (okay I got a chuckle out of their awkwardness)

I immediately jumped on this with blaming segregation for these so-called “ills”…..

Here in the South segregation was a enforceable social event.  Blacks were herded into enclaves in cities and towns…..they had the own medical services, education, lingo and music.

Then when segregation was overturned whites began wanting to include the Afro-American people into the land of the Whites.

They wanted Blacks to embrace the white world in all its glory (sarcasm)…..the lingo, the attitudes, the music……but to their disappointment that never occurred….why?

Think about it.

Why would Black people need to change their way of thinking and acting?  Is it because whites think they are better than the Blacks?

This made me think of something I had read many years ago…..the writings of Frantz Fanon…….French philosopher and psychologist…..A psychological study of the effects of the concept of race and racism on black minorities in white majority societies.

Frantz Fanon was born in the French colony of Martinique on July 20, 1925. His family occupied a social position within Martinican society that could reasonably qualify them as part of the black bourgeoisie; Frantz’s father, Casimir Fanon, was a customs inspector and his mother, Eléanore Médélice, owned a hardware store in downtown Fort-de-France, the capital of Martinique. Members of this social stratum tended to strive for assimilation, and identification, with white French culture. Fanon was raised in this environment, learning France’s history as his own, until his high school years when he first encountered the philosophy of negritude, taught to him by Aimé Césaire, Martinique’s other renowned critic of European colonization. Politicized, and torn between the assimilationism of Martinique’s middle class and the preoccupation with racial identity that negritude promotes, Fanon left the colony in 1943, at the age of 18, to fight with the Free French forces in the waning days of World War II.

Frantz Fanon

Fanon’s key works are Black Skins White Masks, A Dying Colonialism, The Wretched of the Earth, and Toward the African Revolution. Black Skins White Masks was published in 1952 but did not gain widespread recognition until the late 1960s. This was one of the first books to analyse the psychology of colonialism. In it Fanon examines how the colonizer internalises colonialism and its attendant ideologies, and how colonized peoples in turn internalise the idea of their own inferiority and ultimately come to emulate their oppressors. Racism here functions as a controlling mechanism which maintains colonial relations as ‘natural’ occurrences. Black Skins White Masks is written in an urgent, fluid style. It is both analytical and passionate, part academic text, part polemic. The book has provided a powerful and lasting indictment of racism and imperialism.

Basically Fanon says there is a cycle…..

White colonials preach black is inferior

Colonized people want to escape their “inferior” position

Only escape is to reject “blackness”

Colonized people start assume superiority

Finally…for the Black man there is only one destiny…..and it is white

Fanon’s book is a very good look at race and racism……read….

Click to access %5BFrantz_Fanon%5D_Black_Skin,_White_Masks_(Pluto_Clas(BookZZ.org).pdf

And since people seldom read anymore….I will give a link to the audible of this book…..

Racism is an ugly word and as soon as we can eliminate from normal discourse the better.

In closing a short video….What If Slavery Never Existed

Learn Stuff!

I Read, I Write, You Know

“lego ergo scribo”