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Education By Lotto

Today is the magic day….the day when Mississippi’s new charter school law goes into effect……I bet you are asking just what the Hell is that all about…..will read on, McDuff…..

The new law allows up to 15 start-ups a year under the only authorizer in the state: the Mississippi Charter School Authorizer Board. In low-performing Districts (those rated ‘D’ or ‘F’), these schools can launch without local school board approval, but local districts will have veto power over start-ups in A, B and C districts. One of the proponents of this new law, Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves, feels that once charter schools prove themselves, the A, B, and C-rated districts will welcome start-up applicants as well, but for now Mississippi’s law clearly directs charter schools toward the lowest performing communities.

Mississippi has a notoriously poor education system even though the residents are promised a better one with each election and seldom see any change…..but Bryant and his band of confederates have given us a ‘new’ program….that being one of charter schools.

Charter schools where your child’s education is in the hands of an idiot with a bingo machine….it is a lotto….and you know your odds of winning the lottery, right?

Critics feel that it is unacceptably difficult to enforce the provisions of the charter, which they say makes charter schools essentially accountable to no one. The basic concept of charter schools is that they exercise increased autonomy in return for this greater accountability. They are accountable for both academic results and fiscal practices to several groups, including the sponsor that grants them, the parents who choose them, and the public that funds them. Charter schools can theoretically be closed for failing to meet the terms set forth in their charter, but in practice, this can be difficult, divisive and controversial. One example was the 2003 revocation of the charter for a school called Urban Pioneer in the San Francisco Unified School District, which first came under scrutiny when two students died on a school wilderness outing. An auditor’s report found that the school was in financial disarray and posted the lowest test scores of any school in the district except those serving entirely non-English-speakers. It was also accused of academic fraud, graduating students with far fewer than the required credits. Yet charter-school advocates led a heated and divisive protest against revoking the charter. In addition, even greater concerns arise when, as in Michigan, many charter schools are run for profit. Many educators worry that education will suffer when funding is split between profit and educational spending, rather than going completely toward teaching as is done in traditional public schools. Studies have already shown many instances of charter schools cutting programs or refusing the educate students with special needs so as to maintain profitability. Charter schools in Michigan, where for-profit charters are common, have largely been poorly implemented and students have performed at a much lower level than their traditional public school counterparts.

This will do little to improve the education of all students….it will however help some to a good education and the raising of profits for the private companies that will be in control…..

Is this the educational system you were promised or for that matter the one you voted for in the last comedy we call elections?

Breaking: State Judge blocks Open-carry law from taking effect.

29 June 2013 Leave a comment

This is a silly law….guns everywhere…..idiots with guns is never a good idea…..we will see how far this goes…legally that is…..

Mississippi PEP

A state judge blocked Mississippi’s open-carry gun law from taking effect next week, writing in a Friday ruling that the law was vague and that an injunction was needed to prevent irreparable harm.

Hinds County Circuit Judge Winston Kidd scheduled a hearing July 8 to consider more arguments about whether to extend the injunction.

Hinds County District Attorney Robert Shuler Smith requested that the law be blocked, and Kidd granted the temporary injunction during an emergency hearing.

House Bill 2 clarifies that people in Mississippi don’t need any kind of state-issued permit to carry a gun that’s not concealed.

The bill’s main sponsor, Republican Rep. Andy Gipson, of Braxton, said the law simply restates the state constitution’s right to bear arms. But some sheriffs and police chiefs worry people could become trigger-happy and hurt civilians or law-enforcement officers.

“I never thought I’d live to see a lawsuit filed to say…

View original post 35 more words

Things Can Only Get Better

18 June 2013 Leave a comment

That statement has been passed around elections in Mississippi for decades….the candidates are all about jobs and education and well pick a subject….we voters have been promised so much and so little has been delivered……

Most recently the Wall Street has conducted a survey of states and gave them a ranking……

24/7 Wall St. considered data from a number of sources, including Standard & Poor’s, the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, the U.S. Census Bureau, the Tax Foundation, RealtyTrac, The Federal Bureau of Investigation and the National Conference of State Legislators.

Unemployment data was taken from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Credit ratings were from ratings agencies S&P and Moody’s. We relied on the FBI’s Uniform Crime Report for violent crime rate by state and large metropolitan areas. RealtyTrac provided foreclosure rates.

A significant amount of the data we used came from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. Data from ACS included percentage of residents below the poverty line, high school completion for those 25 and older, median household income, percentage of the population without health insurance and the change in median home values from 2006 to 2011. These are the values we used in our ranking.

Once we reviewed the sources and compiled the final metrics, we ranked each state based on its performance in all the categories. All data are for the full year 2011, with the exception of debt per capita, obtained from the Tax Foundation, and state budgetary data, which came from the U.S. Census Bureau, and is for fiscal year 2010. New to this year’s study was our more detailed review of state industry for 2011, from the the Bureau of Economic Analysis, exports per capita for 2011, from the Census Bureau, and the 2010 tax burden and the current tax business climate, from the Tax Foundation.

And now….may I have a drum roll please…..hoiw did the great state of Mississippi do on the rankings?

40. Mississippi
> Debt per capita: $2,182 (11th lowest)
> Budget deficit: 15.9% (tied-22nd largest)
> Unemployment: 10.7% (4th highest)
> Median household income: $36,919 (the lowest)
> Pct. below poverty line: 22.6% (the highest)

Last year, Mississippi had the nation’s lowest median income. At just under $37,000, it was more than $13,500 below the national median income. Along with that distinction, no state had a higher poverty rate than Mississippi’s 22.6%, which was double the rate of six states. Mississippi has also fallen behind the rest of the nation in recovering from the financial crisis. The state’s GDP shrank by 0.8% in 2011, the second largest decline in the country, and 10.7% of the state’s workforce was unemployed, the fourth-highest figure in the U.S. According to The Commercial Appeal, there are currently as many residents employed as in the mid-1990s, though the state’s population has risen from 2.7 million to nearly 3 million.

Th3e ONLY good news in this survey is….there are 10 states below us….which is a pretty good standing for the state….we are usually at the bottom of every good list and the top of every bad list……

When will the people of Mississippi demand their elected clowns actually do something for the people of the state and stop playing their political games?

The best answer is….I will be dead and gone before that happens!

Bryant On The Run

Cartoon from the Clarion Ledger

Open Letter

This is a letter I sent to the city council awhile back….of curse there was no reply…I did not expect one….this is a valid proposal and would do alot to raise the much needed funds of which the city is in desperate need……..

Open Letter To The City Council Of Gulfport, Mississippi

The city has been having its problems with the generation of much needed funds for programs that will benefit its citizens. There is a way to generate these funds and that course is called Land Value Tax. For years I have been advocating this form of taxation to no avail, but with the economic situation getting worse by the day, I believe this idea can save the city from massive cuts in services.

According to the Mississippi Economic Policy Center, any tax reform should conform to a 3 principle outline.  These are:  1—Be balanced and make work pay, 2—should create opportunity for economic growth and 3—be accountable to the taxpayer.  The Land Value Tax (LVT) addresses all three of the concerns put forth by the MEPC.

Land rent means taxing land. Not buildings, not work, not commerce, just bare land. Or if land has buildings (as most land has) then the equivalent value of the land if it had no buildings.

Land gets its value its improvements (buildings etc) and from its location. The improvements were made by the hard work of the owners. But the location has value because of what society does, because of roads and schools and good neighbors.

If society taxes buildings and improvements, it steals people’s hard work, their time and energy, their life. Most taxation is therefore theft. But if society taxes the location, then it simply claims back the value it creates. Land rent distinguishes between the individual’s property and society’s property.

Land rent creates fairness in the most basic of all issues: who controls the ground beneath our feet.

Land rent is the only rational tax, because it is based on a sound theory of property (you create it, you own it).

Land rent means an end to every other tax. So it becomes much cheaper to create additional jobs and manufacture goods. So wealth increases.

If you tax work, the amount of work goes down, because some work becomes less profitable. But if you tax land, the amount of land remains the same. So if you want to encourage work, you should tax land, not work.

Land rent is the only guarantee of fair property rights. If people can charge rent but they pay no rent themselves, eventually one person or one elite will own everything and nobody else can have any property unless it suits the elite. To see why, play the game Monopoly. Monopoly is based on “The Landlord’s Game,” invented by Lizzie Magie as a way to show why we need land rent.

Land rent is the most efficient way of creating wealth because it gives resources to those who can use them best (that is, those who can generate the most wealth from the land).

Land rent creates economic justice, by ensuring that everyone keeps the wealth they create, and any extra is given back to society. So nobody has unfair privileges, and everyone has an equal chance to succeed.

Land rent provides a fair system for all, because it generates wealth for society, yet it is so simple that corruption and inefficiency have nowhere to hide.

It is as simple as that….it would not take a massive bureaucracy to change the taxation of the city…

If further information is needed I may be contacted at:

CG Streuly

2605 Demaret Drive

Gulfport, MS 39507

Email: chuqalam@gmail.com

New Ideas Of State Reps

8 February 2010 Leave a comment

I got this email recently from the Progressive States Network and thought I would pass it along to the readers….some of the ideas are pretty good and innovative and some are just dumb….

Job Creation Opportunities During a Recession

Kauffman Foundation – The Economic Future Just Happened
Information Technology and Innovation Foundation – 2008 State New Economy Index
Kauffman Foundation – Better, Faster, Cheaper: The New Bootstrap Job Creator”

State Venture Capital Funds

National Governors Association – State Strategies to Promote Angel Investment for Economic Growth
NASVF – U.S. State-Supported Venture Capital Funds

Encourage Technology Transfer and Commercialization

Pennsylvania Economy League – A Continuing Record of Achievement: The Economic Impact of Ben Franklin Technology Partners 2002-2006
U.S. Department of Commerce, Economic Development Administration – Construction Grants Program Impact Assessment Report
Information Technology and Innovation Foundation – 2008 State New Economy Index
Batelle and the Association of University Research Parks – Characteristics and Trends in North American Research Parks

Strengthen Industry Partnerships & Clusters

Keystone Research Center – Pennsylvania’s Industry Partnership Strategy
Steel Valley Authority (SVA) – Early Warning and Layoff Aversio
Seattle Foundation and SkillUp Washington –  Creating Stronger Workforce Partnerships In Manufacturing
National Fund for Workforce Solutions – The Principles of the National Fund for Workforce Solutions and Their Implications for Public Policy
National Governors Association – Cluster-Based Strategies for Growing State Economies

State government needs all the help it can get….but unfortunately politics is NOT always the best for the state…just the individuals that play the game……

Fight Against Dirty Coal Plant

1 February 2010 Leave a comment

I got this email from the Sierra Club and wanted to pass it along….Mississippi is already the most littered state…so let us try and keep it a bit cleaner…if possible…..

Do you think $2.8 billion for a dirty coal plant is a good investment for Mississippi? Mississippi Power is proposing an enormous, dirty coal plant in Kemper County and will pass on the construction cost to their customers, causing monthly bills to increase by 200%!

Take action now to oppose Mississippi Power’s $2.8 billion dollar coal plant in Kemper County.

Mississippi’s Public Service Commission (PSC) is accepting public comments through the public hearing on February 5th.  We need your input as they consider granting the certificate of need for this multi-billion dollar, dirty, unnecessary coal plant.

There are cleaner, healthier solutions to Mississippi. There is over 7,000 MW of power in cleaner burning natural gas plants that are sitting idle while MS Power claims there are no other sources of energy.  Energy efficiency and conservation should be the “first fuel” that should be utilized and considered before saddling electric customers with billions of dollars of debt for decades to come.

Please submit a public comment now and encourage your friends and family to do the same.

Take Action here: http://action.sierraclub.org/Stop_Kemper

If you love your state and want to keep it as pristine as possible….GET INVOLVED!