The State And Local Crisis

The pandemic has caused so many problems for state and local governments…..the  biggest problem is yet to come.

The budgets and and revenues will be a insurmountable problem that needs a solution that will benefit everyone and crap on none.

US local and state governments are reopening the economy as the pandemic continues to spread, although mass testing for COVID-19 and contact tracing programs are absent. At the same time, new state and local budget projections for the coming fiscal year paint an even grimmer picture than what was expected at the beginning of the month.

The Center on Budget Policy and Priorities (CBPP) has reported a 25 percent decline in revenues for some states in April alone. The CBPP now predicts that US state budget shortfalls will reach $765 billion over the next three years due to the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. The report points out the strong relationship between unemployment rates and shortfalls in state budgets, which are critical for providing health care, housing, education, infrastructure and social welfare programs.

According to CBPP, several states have already predicted major reductions in revenue for 2020, including Massachusetts ($4.5 billion, or 15 percent of the state budget); Michigan ($3.2 billion, or 13 percent); and Utah ($1.4 billion, or 18 percent). For the next two years, some states are projecting even steeper drops, such as California ($32 billion in 2021, or 21 percent of its state budget); New York state ($12 billion in 2021 and $16 billion in 2022, or 14 and 17 percent of its annual budget); and Colorado ($3.2 billion in 2021 and $4 billion in 2022, 24 and 17 percent of its annual budgets, respectively).

https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2020/05/27/budg-m27.html

There is a solution that has been around for over 100 years…..it is called Land Value Tax….

Land Value Taxation is a method of raising public revenue by means of an annual charge on the rental value of land. If you do not want to read through this text, you can watch this ten minute video by Dominic Frisby.

The below advantages are  from http://www.landvaluetax.org/

  • A NATURAL SOURCE OF PUBLIC REVENUE. All land makes its full contribution to the Exchequer, allowing reductions in existing taxes on labour and enterprise.
  • A STRONGER ECONOMY. If we tax labour, buildings or machinery and plant, we discourage people from constructive and beneficial activities and penalise enterprise and efficiency. The reverse is the case with a tax on land values, which is payable regardless of whether or how well the land is actually used. It is a payment, based on current market value, for the exclusive occupation of a piece of land. In the longer term, this fundamentally new and different approach to revenue raising will stimulate new business and new employment, reducing the need for costly government welfare.
  • MARGINAL AREAS REVITALISED. Economic actitivities are handicapped by distance from the major centres of population. Conventional taxes such as VAT and those on transport fuels cause particular damage to the remoter areas of the country. Land Value Tax, by definition, bears lightly or not at all where land has little or no value, thereby stimulating economic activity away from the centre – it creates what are in effect tax havens exactly where they are most needed.
  • A MORE EFFICIENT LAND MARKET. The necessity to pay the tax obliges landowners to develop vacant and under-used land properly or to make way for others who will.
  • LESS URBAN SPRAWL. Land Value Taxation deters speculative land holding. Thus dilapidated inner-city areas are returned to good use, reducing the pressure for building on green-field sites.
  • LESS BUREAUCRACY. The complexities of Income Tax, Inheritance Tax, Capital Gains Tax and VAT are well known. By contrast, Land Value Tax is straightforward. Once the system has settled down, landholders will not be faced with complicated forms and demands for information. Revaluation will become relatively simple.
  • NO AVOIDANCE OR EVASION. Land cannot be hidden, removed to a tax haven or concealed in an electronic data system.
  • AN END TO BOOM-SLUMP CYCLES. Speculation in land value – frequently misrepresented and disguised as “property” or “asset” speculation – is the root cause of unsustainable booms which result periodically in damaging corrective slumps. Land Value Taxation, fully and properly applied, knocks the speculative element out of land pricing.
  • IMPOSSIBLE TO PASS ON IN HIGHER PRICES, LOWER WAGES OR HIGHER RENTS. Competition makes it impossible for a business producing goods on a valuable site to charge more per item than one producing similar goods on less valuable land – after all, producers and traders at different locations are paying different rents to landlords now, yet like goods generally sell for much the same price and employers pay their workers comparable wages. The tax cannot be passed on to a tenant who is already paying the full market rent.

I wrote about this here on GSFP……https://gulfsouthfreepress.wordpress.com/land-value-taxation/

This will be hard to convince the politicians of this….but as they struggle to balance the budgets this will be a good solution ….but will legal bribes prevent a solution?

I Read, I Write, You Know

“lego ergo scribo”

Open Letter

This is a letter I sent to the city council awhile back….of curse there was no reply…I did not expect one….this is a valid proposal and would do alot to raise the much needed funds of which the city is in desperate need……..

Open Letter To The City Council Of Gulfport, Mississippi

The city has been having its problems with the generation of much needed funds for programs that will benefit its citizens. There is a way to generate these funds and that course is called Land Value Tax. For years I have been advocating this form of taxation to no avail, but with the economic situation getting worse by the day, I believe this idea can save the city from massive cuts in services.

According to the Mississippi Economic Policy Center, any tax reform should conform to a 3 principle outline.  These are:  1—Be balanced and make work pay, 2—should create opportunity for economic growth and 3—be accountable to the taxpayer.  The Land Value Tax (LVT) addresses all three of the concerns put forth by the MEPC.

Land rent means taxing land. Not buildings, not work, not commerce, just bare land. Or if land has buildings (as most land has) then the equivalent value of the land if it had no buildings.

Land gets its value its improvements (buildings etc) and from its location. The improvements were made by the hard work of the owners. But the location has value because of what society does, because of roads and schools and good neighbors.

If society taxes buildings and improvements, it steals people’s hard work, their time and energy, their life. Most taxation is therefore theft. But if society taxes the location, then it simply claims back the value it creates. Land rent distinguishes between the individual’s property and society’s property.

Land rent creates fairness in the most basic of all issues: who controls the ground beneath our feet.

Land rent is the only rational tax, because it is based on a sound theory of property (you create it, you own it).

Land rent means an end to every other tax. So it becomes much cheaper to create additional jobs and manufacture goods. So wealth increases.

If you tax work, the amount of work goes down, because some work becomes less profitable. But if you tax land, the amount of land remains the same. So if you want to encourage work, you should tax land, not work.

Land rent is the only guarantee of fair property rights. If people can charge rent but they pay no rent themselves, eventually one person or one elite will own everything and nobody else can have any property unless it suits the elite. To see why, play the game Monopoly. Monopoly is based on “The Landlord’s Game,” invented by Lizzie Magie as a way to show why we need land rent.

Land rent is the most efficient way of creating wealth because it gives resources to those who can use them best (that is, those who can generate the most wealth from the land).

Land rent creates economic justice, by ensuring that everyone keeps the wealth they create, and any extra is given back to society. So nobody has unfair privileges, and everyone has an equal chance to succeed.

Land rent provides a fair system for all, because it generates wealth for society, yet it is so simple that corruption and inefficiency have nowhere to hide.

It is as simple as that….it would not take a massive bureaucracy to change the taxation of the city…

If further information is needed I may be contacted at:

CG Streuly

2605 Demaret Drive

Gulfport, MS 39507

Email: chuqalam@gmail.com

Whose Idea Is It?

We all have heard the stories of how the state is suffering from this recession….that the revenues of the state are reaching record lows….sad to say we are not alone…..all states are suffering from the same problems in their budgets….but I will focus on Mississippi…..

I keep bring up that fact that the state’s revenue comes from the imposition of taxes….without taxes there is NO services that the state is required to offer the people…..and yet every time the legislature meets there is some that want, including the governor, to cut taxes, almost ALL taxes…..do they NOT see what that does for their budgets…..or is it they do not care and need the cuts to pad their political resumes for their next campaign?  IMO, it is the latter!

Property taxes?  And sales taxes?  You do realize that this is the most important tax?  Why?  The collection of property taxes is one of the chief sources of revenue for state and local government and then the collection of state sales tax……and now the new legislative session has a couple of bills before it:

First there is SB 2288 which states:

AN ACT TO AUTHORIZE THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS OF A COUNTY AND/OR THE GOVERNING AUTHORITIES OF A MUNICIPALITY TO GRANT A PARTIAL AD VALOREM TAX EXEMPTION FOR AGRICULTURAL PROPERTY THAT IS BEING CONVERTED TO A RESIDENTIAL USE

And then there is HB 4 which states:

AN ACT TO AMEND SECTION 27-65-17, MISSISSIPPI CODE OF 1972, TO REDUCE THE SALES TAX RATE ON RETAIL SALES OF MOTORCYCLES FROM SEVEN PERCENT TO FIVE PERCENT;

Just those two bills would decrease the amount of revenue that is coming in…,…state legislators will have to deal with the budget shortfalls by cutting the services and programs that it funds….you have that right?……first, programs for the poor and disadvantage will suffer, i.e.  Medicaid and then once that sector is officially killed they will move to such other programs as educational and so forth……all that is just fine for some but they have NOT looked at it realistic……once all the other programs have been cut to the bone and there is still a shortfall then cuts will be made to programs that effect the white people the most….like fire and police….and then the voice of the people will be heard at least if the politicians want to be re-elected……

But will the people finally realize that to keep cutting taxes is NOT the way to fund programs that benefit ALL Mississippians?

To answer my own question….maybe finally the people of Mississippi will be open to the idea of land value taxation (LVT)…….this could go a long way to solving ALL of Mississippi’s financial problems….it is worth a look…so why waste time BS-ing the people and find the cure…it is there just grow a set of cajones and try it…..it could not be as bad as the crap you put us through yearly…..Just a thought…..

The Genius Of The State Politician

For years I have been a staunch opponent of the tax breaks and tax cuts that are thrown around liberally just to gain votes….I have said that all this will come back to bite them in the butt……BAM!  The jaws are open…..

New US census data show that state and local government tax revenue continued their year-long plunge in the third quarter, falling by 7 percent from the same period last year. In response, governments are cutting spending on social programs, infrastructure and education, and are laying off or cutting the wages of government workers.

It was the fourth straight quarter in which tax receipts fell on a year-over-year basis, the Census Bureau’s Quarterly Summary of State and Local Tax Revenue shows. Collections for 2009 through the third quarter were down $76 billion, or 8 percent, from a year ago, while federal tax revenue fell even more sharply in the same period, by 19 percent.

Every major form of state and local tax revenue declined. Totals for sales and personal income taxes fell by 9 percent and 12 percent, respectively. The erosion of these two taxes, on which state governments rely, is owed largely to unemployment and wage cuts.

Taxes on business profits fell precipitously, by 18 percent in the third quarter, year-over-year.

Property tax collections actually increased by 3.6 percent in the third quarter of 2009 from 2008. However, analysts explain that government property assessments have simply not yet caught up with market-determined home and commercial real estate values. This gap is expected to begin to be bridged in 2010, imperiling municipal and county governments heavily reliant on property taxes.

According to a study by the National Conference of State Legislators (NCSL), states cut nearly $150 billion in spending to balance budgets in the current fiscal year. But already, 36 states have seen gaps reopen to a combined deficit of $28.2 billion. These deficits will worsen. In 2011, 35 states making estimates predict a combined deficit of $55.5 billion. In 2012, just 23 states offering data already estimate red ink totaling $68.8 billion.

No state has been spared from falling revenues. Energy-rich states that averted budget crises last year were hit particularly hard by third-quarter revenue declines, among them Texas, Oklahoma, Wyoming, North Dakota and Alaska. The latter, with a 65 percent decline, experienced the biggest year-over-year dropoff. In all, 22 states, including Illinois, saw a third-quarter revenue decline greater than 10 percent.

These shortfalls will inevitably lead to more cuts in social spending and further layoffs, wage cuts and furloughs for state workers. Layoffs of government workers could produce the next wave of unemployment in the US, where fully 15 percent of the non-agricultural workforce is employed by state or local governments.

Sounds like a crisis coming, huh?  They were warned……they will not get much help from the federal government either…….and who will suffer the most?  The poor and the middle class….that is who…and yet they will help return the same batch of idiots to power at every vote…… wait there is a saying that describes this phenom…….”Stupidity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different outcome”……

Sorry people, but the only way that services can be provided to the people is with revenue and revenue comes from taxes…….sorry, it is just that simple…….if you want the services for your family then tell the politicians they need to find a more equitable way of taxation…….May I suggest Land Value Taxation (LVT)……it is worth a look…..that is if you truly care about the people you represent……but that may be a bit much to ask of you guys……

There Is Always Bad News For Revenue

It constantly amazes me that the state and local administrations continue to have a difficult time finding the money to fund the needed programs.  Yet there is a way and a way that could lead to a self-sufficient community, but stupidity comes into the equation.

Year after year after year, funds are not available and year after year the legislature tries to find ways to come up with the cash.  Most times it involves the bulk of the responsibility falls on the shoulders of the working class in Mississippi.

It is time for the state and local entities to find a better way to raise funds that are needed.  As the economy keeps getting worse, funds become smaller and smaller, the people of the state become less and less safe and secure.

The only way to keep the much needed cash rolling into the coffers is by finally accepting the need for Land Value Taxation.  (read page on LVT)  Why?  Easy answer…it fits all the requirements of a perfect tax.  These are:  1–the distribution of the burden would be equitable, 2–tax should minimize the effect on economic activity, 3–the structure should facilitate stabilization and economic growth, 4–should be simple and easily understood by the taxpayer.

If you want the governmental services for your community then a new system of taxation must be found.  It can be done and the people can make it happen.  But as long as they depend on the stale thinking of the past then their community will suffer and possibly wither and die.

It is your choice.

Time To Rethink Property Taxes

Mississippi is struggling with the reality that there is not enough cash to pay for the programs they have, much less any new programs.  The tax structure has been the problem….give aways to business and increases on others have made the whole system a joke at best.  It is time to rethink taxes, especially property taxes.

May I see a show of hands on the people that pay NO property tax thanks to Homestead Exemption?

I hate to be the one that pops a bubble here….but…you do realize that property taxes pays for such services as schools and funds many local programs, right?  Times are tough and getting tougher every year and every year the local politicians find ways to tax everybody.  Eventually reality will set in.

For too long Mississippi has given away revenue with the hope of attracting business and then asks the working majority to foot the bill.  There is a better way…and it would be a win-win scenario.

By making the Land Value Tax the rule, then the Coast and all of Mississippi could have the needed funds to use where it is needed, whether it is education or Medicaid or wherever.

Land rent means taxing land. Not buildings, not work, not commerce, just bare land. Or if land has buildings (as most land has) then the equivalent value of the land if it had no buildings.

Land gets its value its improvements (buildings etc) and from its location. The improvements were made by the hard work of the owners. But the location has value because of what society does, because of roads and schools and good neighbors.

If society taxes buildings and improvements, it steals people’s hard work, their time and energy, their life. Most taxation is therefore theft. But if society taxes the location, then it simply claims back the value it creates. Land rent distinguishes between the individual’s property and society’s property.

If you tax work, the amount of work goes down, because some work becomes less profitable. But if you tax land, the amount of land remains the same. So if you want to encourage work, you should tax land, not work.

Land rent is the only guarantee of fair property rights. If people can charge rent but they pay no rent themselves, eventually one person or one elite will own everything and nobody else can have any property unless it suits the elite. To see why, play the game Monopoly. Monopoly is based on “The Landlord’s Game,” invented by Lizzie Magie as a way to show why we need land rent.

Land rent is the most efficient way of creating wealth because it gives resources to those who can use them best (that is, those who can generate the most wealth from the land).

Land rent creates economic justice, by ensuring that everyone keeps the wealth they create, and any extra is given back to society. So nobody has unfair privileges, and everyone has an equal chance to succeed.

Land rent provides a fair system for all, because it generates wealth for society, yet it is so simple that corruption and inefficiency have nowhere to hide.  This is a definite plus, for today, those are the major problems with the taxation of land.


Even the Mississippi Economic Policy Center has called for the state to revamp its taxation system, then why not take the opportunity to truly revamp the tax policy?  Mississippi is always in need of funds, but its ruling few refuse to find a more equitable system.  The economic situation that Mississippi and the country finds themselves is a perfect time to find a more efficient tax system.

Taxation Proposal

In a local Coast community, Ocean Springs, MS has come up with a novel idea to get people to expand or innovate their businesses.

The proposed tax abatement will allow businesses to deduct up to 80 percent of their city property tax for a period of 10 years on any expansions or renovations.

It does not apply to businesses such as apartment complexes and condominiums.

Mayor Connie Moran said some business owners in Ocean Springs are unsure about expanding or renovating their businesses because of the higher tax bill they’ll receive.

By receiving a break on their city taxes, they can proceed with their improvement projects.

Another give away to business—where will the city make up for the revenue loss for this move?

Instead of looking for ways to increase the revenue and thusly able to fund city preojects without going in the hole, these people want to give away the revenue and worry about it later.  It is all just a stupid political game.

This could be avoided by one very simple move–Land Value Taxation–it is not a difficult thing to do…it will take will and ability…two things that most of the mayors on the Coast do not have.  They are elected by personality and likability, not capability

If more is needed about LVT then please click on my page here entitled, Land Value Taxation, and an explanation of the proposal will be there to check it out.

Open Letter To Gulfport

This is a copy of the letter I sent to the City Council of the city of Gulfport and will send it soon to the Board of Supervisors.

Open Letter To The City Council Of Gulfport, Mississippi

The city has been having its problems with the generation of much needed funds for programs that will benefit its citizens. There is a way to generate these funds and that course is called Land Value Tax. For years I have been advocating this form of taxation to no avail, but with the economic situation getting worse by the day, I believe this idea can save the city from massive cuts in services.

According to the Mississippi Economic Policy Center, any tax reform should conform to a 3 principle outline.  These are:  1—Be balanced and make work pay, 2—should create opportunity for economic growth and 3—be accountable to the taxpayer.  The Land Value Tax (LVT) addresses all three of the concerns put forth by the MEPC.

Land rent means taxing land. Not buildings, not work, not commerce, just bare land. Or if land has buildings (as most land has) then the equivalent value of the land if it had no buildings.

Land gets its value its improvements (buildings etc) and from its location. The improvements were made by the hard work of the owners. But the location has value because of what society does, because of roads and schools and good neighbors.

If society taxes buildings and improvements, it steals people’s hard work, their time and energy, their life. Most taxation is therefore theft. But if society taxes the location, then it simply claims back the value it creates. Land rent distinguishes between the individual’s property and society’s property.

Land rent creates fairness in the most basic of all issues: who controls the ground beneath our feet.

Land rent is the only rational tax, because it is based on a sound theory of property (you create it, you own it).

Land rent means an end to every other tax. So it becomes much cheaper to create additional jobs and manufacture goods. So wealth increases.

If you tax work, the amount of work goes down, because some work becomes less profitable. But if you tax land, the amount of land remains the same. So if you want to encourage work, you should tax land, not work.

Land rent is the only guarantee of fair property rights. If people can charge rent but they pay no rent themselves, eventually one person or one elite will own everything and nobody else can have any property unless it suits the elite. To see why, play the game Monopoly. Monopoly is based on “The Landlord’s Game,” invented by Lizzie Magie as a way to show why we need land rent.

Land rent is the most efficient way of creating wealth because it gives resources to those who can use them best (that is, those who can generate the most wealth from the land).

Land rent creates economic justice, by ensuring that everyone keeps the wealth they create, and any extra is given back to society. So nobody has unfair privileges, and everyone has an equal chance to succeed.

Land rent provides a fair system for all, because it generates wealth for society, yet it is so simple that corruption and inefficiency have nowhere to hide.

It is as simple as that….it would not take a massive bureaucracy to change the taxation of the city…

If further information is needed I may be contacted at:

Car Tag Price Hike

If you were expecting to see some analysis of yesterday’s inauguration then I suggest that the TV will be a better place to be.  They are dissecting every little piece of speech looking for something to use in their little 30 second sound bite.  Mississippi has major problems and that is my concern for they must be fixed if the state is to ever move into the 21st century.

Now on with the show.

A slump in automobile sales could lead to higher car-tag prices in Mississippi unless officials quickly find a way to head off the problem, a top lawmaker says.

The Associated Press obtained a copy of a memo the state Tax Commission sent this past week to Gov. Haley Barbour and lawmakers. The commission says money is running low in a state fund that, since the mid-1990s, has given drivers an annual discount when they buy or renew their car tags.

The price of car tags varies widely in Mississippi, depending on where people live and what kind of vehicles they drive. The tag for a new Lexus or Mercedes Benz could cost hundreds of dollars, while one for an old klunker is relatively cheap.

Officials say it’s impossible to pinpoint how much the price of an individual tag might increase because there are too many uncertainties now.

Lawmakers found a way in 1994 to ease the problem of expensive tags without gutting the county budgets that depend on the annual tax collections from tag renewals.

Figuring that buyers could add the cost of a higher sales tax to the financing for a vehicle, officials increased the sales tax rate for cars and trucks. They created a fund to hold a portion of the 5 percent vehicle sales tax. Money from the fund is diverted to the 82 counties to replace local taxes that are lost because of the tag-renewal discounts.

The result: The consumer pays higher taxes up front and gets some relief from the annual sticker shock of a tag renewal that can cost, in some cases, as much as a home mortgage payment.

In healthy economic times, the fund to provide the tag relief has remained in good shape. But during the plunge of the past few months, vehicle sales have dropped and so have tax collections.

With the passing of every day it becomes apparent that Mississippi needs a new way to generate funds, without screwing the people……there is an answer and it is as simple as “land value tax”.  It is simple to install and simple and easily collected.  Why not try a new approach?  Just what would be the harm?

Are There Any Realsitic Answers For Taxation?

Oh yeah…there is…but are they willing to do the right thing?

Taxes– Truth Not Spoken

During the last election the voter was bombarded endlessly with this tax scheme or that.  They were hit with accusations of higher taxes and the promise of lower taxes.  It became so confusing that I feel the people stopped listen and moved on to other promises and accusations.

I waited quietly for someone to explain to the people why this proposal would raise taxes or lower them…just saying so…does not make it so.  You people do realize that without taxes their would be very little income for the country, right?

So Irene let us take a look at taxes and what is meant by promises and accusations.

Payroll tax is a “fine” imposed on those who organize employment.

Income tax fines people who engage in production or render services.

Sales tax penalizes people for purchasing goods.

Customs tariffs fine people for buying goods produced in other countries. To do this is economic aggression, and invites reprisals which endanger peaceful relations and are a prelude to war.

Excise duties increase the cost of certain products, reduce demand for such, and worsen unemployment, as do all taxes.

A tax is a compulsory payment to a government unrelated to any direct penalty, voluntary service, or debt. Some payments to governments have the form of a tax, as compulsory payments, but not the substance, since the payment is for a service or rent for the use of property. When an oil company pays a lease for offshore oil fields, for example, this is a rental charge for property owned by the government on behalf of the people, so it is not a tax in substance. Likewise, the collection of land rent by a community may be tax in form as a compulsory payment once the land is obtained, but not in substance, since the ownership of land is voluntary and the payment is a rent for land if one agrees it is properly owned by the community.

Taxes can be imposed on two basic types of items: property and transactions. Transaction taxes includes those on sales, value-added, income, gifts, and inheritance. The effect of imposing such arbitrary costs on transactions is to skew the prices of the items taxed, distorting the price signals of a market economy. Sales taxes make goods more expensive, labor taxes make labor more expensive, and taxes on profits make entrepreneurship and enterprise more expensive by reducing profits. Such taxes have the same effect as an increase in the cost of production due to more expensive inputs. Depending on the responsiveness of supply and demand to changes in price, transaction taxes are partly borne by workers as lower real wages, partly by enterprises as lower total profits, and partly by consumers as higher prices and a lower quantity of goods purchased. Gift taxes punish the free transfer of goods; inheritance taxes punish the preservation of family heritage and the ability to pass on an enterprise to one’s children.

Taxes on income and on sales have a similar effect in reducing output, employment, and income. Taxes on wages, such as income taxes, impose a “tax wedge” on labor, making it expensive to employers while reducing the net wages of workers. This, especially combined with minimum wages, creates unemployment by making the lowest-quality labor too expensive to hire. Taxes on sales also reduce income, since the purpose of production is consumption, and if goods are taxed, purchasing power is reduced. A “value added” tax is imposed at each stage of production; for example, when trees are cut down, when lumber is cut, when furniture is made, and when it is sold, each state gets taxed according to the increase in value from one stage to the next. The result is higher prices, lower output, and lower employment.

Thanks to Henry George there is an answer to the taxation question and the problem.

A tax on land values is of all taxes that which best fulfills every requirement of a perfect tax. As land cannot be hidden or carried off, a tax on land values can be assessed with more certainty and can be collected with greater ease and less expense than any other tax, while it does not in the slightest degree check production or lessen its incentive. It is, in fact, a tax only in form, being in nature a rent — a taking for the use of the community of a value that arises not from individual exertion but from the growth of the community. For it is not anything that the individual owner or user does that gives value to land. The value that he creates is a value that attaches to improvements. This, being the result of individual exertion, properly belongs to the individual, and cannot be taxed without lessening the incentive to production. But the value that attaches to land itself is a value arising from the growth of the community and increasing with social growth. It, therefore, properly belongs to the community, and can be taken to the last penny without in the slightest degree lessening the incentive to production.

There you go, Irene…the Land Value Tax(LVT) could be the answer to a whole plethora of questions…at least it should be considered and not dismissed handily.